Månadsvis arkiv: april 2018

What Can Pluggable Optical Transceivers Do in Data Centers

For data centers, fiber-optic technology is no longer an option, or is only used to solve the most difficult interconnection problems. Today, high broadband, high port density and fiber optic technology are needed to solve low power requirements, and the current optical fiber technology is a kind of batch production technology, low cost, and is widely used in various applications such as switches interconnect and server interface. And in this post, Gigalight will introduce what pluggable optical transceivers can do in data center in detail.

1. Extend Data Center Distance

From 100Mb/s to 100Gb/s, single-channel 25G Ethernet optical transceivers lead the optical transceiver market of next-generation servers and switches. 40G QSFP+ products can support transmission distances up to 300m over multimode optical fibers, which greatly exceeds the standard distance of IEEE 40G Ethernet. In the 40G QSFP+ that transmits on single-mode fiber, and the 10 GSFP+ product that transmits 80 km, our OIF module or CFP2-ACO module supports a transmission distance of 500km or more for data center metro or intercity connectivity.

2. Increase Density and Reduce Power Consumption

Our products are at the leading edge of the next generation of low-power optical transceiver products. The 100G QSFP28 optical transceivers (SR4, LR, CWDM4, and SDWM4) have a maximum power consumption of only 3.5W. The 40G and 100G Quad wire active fiber optic products have power settings that can be flexibly configured by the host system.

3. Deploy with Existing Multimode Fiber

Most data centers today are still based on the 10G Ethernet architecture and use 10Gbase-SR short-haul transmission over OM3/OM4 duplex multimode fiber. With the data center upgrading from 10G to 40G or even 100G, customers still want to retain the existing multi-mode fiber architecture. However, SR4 optical transceivers need to be connected with ribbon multimode optical cables (multi-core) on the interface, and LR4 optical transceivers need to be double. Single-mode fiber, both of which are not present in the data center of currently deployed duplex multimode fiber, QSFP+ LM4 modules allow customers to implement 40 links over existing duplex multimode fiber, SWDM4 modules for customers in the the existing affordable dual-mode multimode fiber architecture enables 40G and 100G Ethernet transmission solutions.

4. from 100G to 200G/400G

Since 2010, the 100G Ethernet optical transceiver has been in a leading position in the market, supplying a large number of CFP optical transceivers for the operator’s routers and transmission systems. Since then, we have continued to expand 100G products and developed and supplied CFP2, CFP4, Modules such as CXP and 100G QSFP28 should be widely used in telecommunication, emerging data centers, and 100G systems in enterprise networks. However, we have not stopped our steps. At present, we are actively leading the development of industry standards and the development of next-generation Ethernet products, including 200G and 400G-rate products that will meet the long-term technical requirements for future high-performance data centers.

0 kommentarer

Three Trends to Drive 100G Ethernet Development

The Ethernet market has seen tremendous growth over the past few years. Accelerating the transmission speed and expanding the capacity of the data center will help promote this trend. According to the IHS Infonetics report, by 2019, 100 Gigabits per second 100G Ethernet will account for more than 50% of the data center fiber transceiver market. As 100G chips are being put into production, the market for 100G Ethernet is accelerating. In this article Gigalight will analyze the three major trends driving the development of the 100G Ethernet market.

1. Data Center Architecture and Traffic Changes

At present, the transmission technology of the optical fiber industry reaches gigabits per second (10G) and 40 gigabits per second (40G), which has been a long time. These technologies are effective and most people have no objection to this. For most users, the 40G transmission speed is more than enough. The problem of data transmission in the data center becomes obvious. The scale and traffic of Internet content providers and companies on cloud data will continue to grow.

Cisco Systems predicts that global data center Internet Protocol (IP) traffic will grow at a 31% annual rate over the next five years. Changes in the way people use the Internet have contributed to this growth. The amount of data in cloud computing is getting larger and larger, and more and more data are being accessed by mobile devices in the world to access video social media content.

The construction of data centers is increasing, which requires a better data management solution. Influx of traffic has led to changes in the way three-tier networks and other ways of changing the flow of information through the data center (that is, the user interface, data processor, and database management system combined). Newer technologies allow parallel processing and can transfer more data. The Internet is becoming more and more complex and websites need more interconnections. The architecture of the data center is changing, focusing more on integrating nodes and increasing bandwidth speed. It is clear that 100G will become the new standard for higher bandwidth and smarter data center architectures.

2. 10G Can’t Meet the Growing Demand for Corporate Networks

Some large data centers have switched. The Howard Hughes Medical Institute recently switched to 100G technologies, delivered through the Brocade MLXE router. The data center includes 56 11G ports, all equipped, and its efficiency has reached the highest priority of the switch. Traditionally, data centers will rely on 10G multi-beam transmissions that require link aggregation and lead to sub-optimal and inefficient load balancing.

This is where 100G comes into play. It frees up space, minimizes data aggregation, and significantly increases overall efficiency. As companies continue to grow in size and data needs become more complex, 100G will provide them with the bandwidth speed and efficiency they desperately need. Companies with four or five 10G ports have witnessed their database growth and may find switching to more affordable and scalable 100G ports. Of course, this is driven by costs and the resources of the company.

3. The Continuous Development of CMOS Technology Will Make 100G Become Mainstreams

With the evolution of 10G technology, before 100G technology becomes mainstream, which requires a certain amount of time to develop transceiver technology. When it is adopted, it is expensive and requires a lot of power. Over time, advances in chip technology have reduced more costs and various energy-saving technologies have emerged. This is exactly the reason that 100G technologies wins in the market, and the adoption of CMOS technology makes it an industry standard. Because using CMOS architecture will make it faster and use less power at the same time.

Once the technology is mature, the 100G system architecture can save more power and provide up to 10 times the speed. Currently, Cisco and Brocade Communications Systems sell 100G switches and routers at the enterprise level. However, the average cost per port of the switch is 2,500 US dollars, which means that companies using 100G networks will have to pay a lot of money. However, with the development of CMOS technology, creating these systems will become easier and more economical. These systems will reduce costs, reduce data center size and power requirements, and make 100G applications mainstream.

About Gigalight:

Gigalight is a design innovator in global optical interconnect field. A series of optical interconnect products include: optical transceivers, passive optical components, active optical cables, GIGAC MTP/MPO cabling, cloud programmers & checkers, etc. Three applications are mainly covered: Data Center & Cloud Computing, MAN & Broadcast Video, and Mobile Network & 5G Optical Transmission. Gigalight takes advantage of its exclusive design to provide clients with one-stop optical network devices and cost-effective products.

0 kommentarer

What Optics Products Are Needed in 5G Fronthaul?

In the past few years, Telecom operators have already upgraded their LTE networks by using additional spectrum, carrier aggregation and LTE-A, and have added Small Cell in Macrocell coverage area to drive the increasement of fronthaul bandwidth requirements. In the current, many operators and equipment vendors have standardized the multi-rate transceivers that support 10Gb/s for all fronthaul requirements. Because they are able to meet most of different transmission speed requirement by one device and decrease the complexity of the specific site design and spare part inventory. Many operators, especially those that lease their fronthaul fiber, also deployed WDM system in their fronthaul networks.

5G Fronthaul Will Need Faster Optical Products, But How Fast?

With the emergence of 5G mobile network, the fronthaul demand will also change. The target peak bandwidth of 5G is 20Gb/s, which will require a higher spectrum than LTE to realize the requirement. That is to say, the shorter wavelength can realize the smaller antenna in the millimeter wave range, thus allows the use of higher order MIMO antenna arrays. In LTE area, 4*8 and 8*8 MIMO have been top. But in 5G area, 64*64 MIMO is also possible. The number of MIMO is higher; the bandwidth required for the corresponding fronthaul link is larger. In the case that other conditions are same, the second way for 5G to increase bandwidth is to use 100 GHz frequency (LTE uses 20GHz), so that can produce a single radio transmission from cellular site to the core network for more than 5 times of bandwidth.

Given the fronthaul bandwidth required to support 5G radio may be have a substantial growth, mobile device manufacturers update the CPRI specification to ”eCPRI” (released in August 2017). One key factor of eCPRI is to transfer some physical layer signal processing from the baseband unit to the radiofrequency pull head (RRH), which in many cases reduces the fronthaul bandwidth to one in ten.

When all the different factors that influence the bandwidth of the 5G fronthaul add up (some drive its growth, some drive it down), the expected bandwidth fall in the 14 Gb/s to 30 Gb/s range, depending on the eCPRI implementation details, base stations, and etc. If the old CPRI scheme is adopted, all physical layer signal processing will remain in the baseband unit, and similar 5G network configuration will require 236Gb/s fronthaul bandwidth. As a result, the 5G base station will generate 160Gb/s or more in nominal terms, and with eCPRI, the actual fronthaul bandwidth required will be 14-30Gb/s.

Just like that 10G optical transceivers can become the actual standard for LTE fronthaul, the next generation of higher standard Ethernet speeds will be applied to 5G fronthaul, which means that 5G deployment will require a large number of 25GbE devices. Even though some components are industrial temperature and/or bidirectional versions specially designed for fronthaul application.

5G Network Will Also Need Higher-speed Optics Products( 25Gb/s or above)

Mobile fronthaul or backhaul need 50G, 100G or even 400G optical transceivers. CPRI alliance has defined fronthaul for a long time, but there is no a consistent definition for wireless backhaul. LightCounting defines the backhaul as the first optical link that begins in BBU and carries the flow from the core network. Other broader definitions include access, aggregation, and core networks. Naturally, if the data flow from BBU to the core network flows to 25Gb/s, then 50G, 10G, or even 400Gb/s transfers may be needed.

0 kommentarer