Federal court hearing marks far west native title claim and challenges by tribes to federal claims against Alaska, which is among the earliest beneficiaries of the land rush and land claims laws, as well as Washington and Oregon, which have since passed their own laws

Federal court hearing marks far west native title claim and challenges by t솔레어 카지노ribes to federal claims against Alaska, which is among the earliest beneficiaries of the land rush and land claims laws, as well as Washington and Oregon, which have since passed their own laws.

“It’s pretty clear who’s going to be the biggest beneficiary,” said Bob Anderson, director of the Center for Law, History and Technology in Olympia, Washington.

The issue of who’s supposed to get land under federal claims has become a contentious public-relations game. The Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Fish and Wildlife Service both say the federal government owns the land, though many tribes dispute those statements.

Some Western tribes sued the state of Alaska over land claims in the 1970s, alleging federal policies violated their treaty rights, but the Supreme Court eventually ruled against Alaska in that dispute.

U.S. District Judge James Pohl in Anchorage, Alaska ruled that Alaska’s claim to land was properly based on treaty. The court said that tribe’s claim to Alaska’s ancestral home territory was “compelling.”

Some of those tribes have since started litigating federal land claims and court cases around the nation. In response, tribal leaders have turned into lobbying groups on behalf of native title.

Among them is the Navajo Nation, the nation’s second-oldest federally recognized Native American tribe.

Jenny Smith, spokeswoman for Nava강원출장마사지jo Nation President Russell Begaye, said the Navajo Nation has hired a consultant on the case but couldn’t comment further because of the proceedings and the legal proceedings already underway.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Fish and Wil월드 카지노dlife Service announced that it would issue a decision this month about whether tribes can sue to protect historic Native American sites and cultural objects.

Some Indian tribes are in a different legal position.

“It’s not really about land yet. Land’s at the bottom of this, and there’s a lot more than this,” said Jeff Williams, director of the state chapter of the American Indian Movement. “The key issue is money, land or people,” he said. “We are seeing this as an Indian-led war between two Indian tribes.”

Williams said the land claim lawsuits are just part of a campaign against native title by Western tribes that, in some cases, are in the pocket of state lawmakers to push their own land claims. Native American groups have already begun funding those battles.

“I don’t think most people really see the connection to state lawmakers and their land claim agenda,” Williams said. “Whe

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